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Posts Tagged ‘Time Travel’

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger ISBN 978-0156029438 – Read by William Hope (Reader), Laurel Lefkow (Reader)

 

Have you ever listened to a book which was a little confusing in audio but thought that if read from a page would have made much more sense?  I do not know about anyone else but this book fell into that category for me.  I really enjoyed the book and the lovely twists and turns and back and forth; the idea of love that transcends time and place.  Maybe my confusion was something that every reader felt, but I believe that this is one book to be read.

cover art from The Time Traveler's Wife

cover art from The Time Traveler’s Wife

Each chapter opens with a time date and age of Henry and Clare.  The audio book has two readers – one reads Henry perspectives and the other reads Clare’s.  They are excellent readers and my complaint has nothing to do with the readers, but unless you have an eidetic memory, very few people as they are driving down the road can remember “Christmas Eve 1991 (Clare is 20, Henry is 28)”

Henry has a condition.  With no control or planning he will all of a sudden leap from this life into a scene from the past, usually a scene with great emotion.  He has seen the car crash where his mother died on any number of occasions, he goes back to when he meets Clare for the first time.  As he ages, the condition is worsening and he has less and less control.  He has found a doctor who is trying to help and found a friend who concocts drug combinations to try and help him stay in one place; but there comes a point when nothing helps.

Clare is a studio artist and Henry is a librarian in a special collection.  A fitting occupation for one who travels through time.

Henry takes nothing from one time to another and arrives naked. So he has had to adapt — find clothes quickly, be able to pick locks and has a loose moral code to allow himself to survive.  Though I may not agree with theft, I might think otherwise if I continually ended up in a strange place in winter with lots of snow on the ground.

This is first and foremost a love story.  Henry and Clare are truly an amazing couple.  Yet this is also a story of fantasy and the magical “what-if”.

I would highly recommend this book for anyone who enjoys literature with a hint of romance and fantasy.  It is a very well written work with some great characters.

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This highly original first novel won the largest advance San Francisco-based MacAdam/Cage had ever paid, and it was money well spent. Niffenegger has written a soaring love story illuminated by dozens of finely observed details and scenes, and one that skates nimbly around a huge conundrum at the heart of the book: Henry De Tamble, a rather dashing librarian at the famous Newberry Library in Chicago, finds himself unavoidably whisked around in time. He disappears from a scene in, say, 1998 to find himself suddenly, usually without his clothes, which mysteriously disappear in transit, at an entirely different place 10 years earlier-or later. During one of these migrations, he drops in on beautiful teenage Clare Abshire, an heiress in a large house on the nearby Michigan peninsula, and a lifelong passion is born. The problem is that while Henry’s age darts back and forth according to his location in time, Clare’s moves forward in the normal manner, so the pair are often out of sync. But such is the author’s tenderness with the characters, and the determinedly ungimmicky way in which she writes of their predicament […] that the book is much more love story than fantasy. It also has a splendidly drawn cast, from Henry’s violinist father […] to Clare’s odd family and a multitude of Chicago bohemian friends. […] It is a fair tribute to her skill and sensibility to say that the book leaves a reader with an impression of life’s riches and strangeness rather than of easy thrills.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Torn: The Missing Book 4 by Margaret Peterson Haddix (read by Chris Sorensen)   ISBN 978-1461840930

Torn by Margaret Peterson Haddix

cover art from Torn by Margaret Peterson Haddix

I have loved the other books in this series but somehow I just couldn’t get into this one.  It could have been that my kids and I started the book and then took a break because we travelled with a friend of the kids and then started another book and it took a while to get back to it so we lost the sequence of the book or maybe it just wasn’t as action packed as previous books or maybe we just weren’t in the right mood.

Jonah and Katherine are forced to go back in time to Hudson Bay Canada in 1611.  They land on a vessel captained by Henry Hudson and there is a mutiny in play.  The two of them cannot see any “tracers” and they remember little from Social Studies class.  Jonah is dressed up as John Hudson, the son of famous explorer and, to be frank, Jonah is more concerned about his friend Angela left in Roanoke in 1600 than he is in figuring out what is wrong in 1611.  Katherine spends the whole amount of time invisible and it seems that Jonah spends much of the time in the stocks.

There are good aspects of this book, but it isn’t the best of the series.  There is a climatic ending that let’s you know the series will continue and that maybe just maybe we will find out who Jonah actually is from history … but if nothing else, we know he is from the 20th century because JB says that since Second messed up history so badly, they can’t travel before the 20th century and then soto voce, he says “You can take a break … for now”.

So yes I would recommend it for those who have started the series because it is helpful to know the developments in the time travel group and the evil Second and the friendly JB, yet this is definitely not the book to recommend to someone who hasn’t read the others.  It is kind of slow…

 

from Amazon.com

Book Description

Series: Missing
Still reeling from their experiences in Roanoke in 1600, Jonah and Katherine arrive in 1611 only moments before a mutiny on Henry Hudson’s ship in the icy waters of James Bay. But things are messed up: They’ve lost the real John Hudson, and they find what seems to be the fabled Northwest Passage—even though they are pretty sure that route doesn’t actually exist. Will this new version of history replace everything they’ve ever known? Is this the end of time as we know it? With more at stake than ever before, Jonah and Katherine struggle to unravel the mysteries of 1611 and the Hudson Passage…before everything they know is lost.

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